Supporting Canadian Athletes

Links

Much of the information athletes need to answer legal questions is available online.  Below are a number of links that can help guide your search.

Sport Dispute Resolution Centre of Canada (SDRCC)http://www.crdsc-sdrcc.ca/

The SDRCC was established on April 1, 2004 under the Physical Activity and Sport Act of 2003 to ensure the fair, equitable, transparent and timely resolution of disputes in Canadian sport, including such disputes as team selection and carding of amateur athletes. Effective June 1, 2004, the SDRCC became responsible for the adjudication of domestic doping cases in Canada. Every athlete agreement, as a condition of Sport Canada’s AAP program, must have a final arbitration provision for appeals to go to the SDRCC. Their website has a wealth of information for dispute resolution and prevention. If you are going to appeal an NSO’s internal panel decision to the SDRCC you need to be aware of, and understand, the SDRCC code (http://www.crdsc-sdrcc.ca/eng/dispute-resolution-code.jsp).

Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (CCES)http://www.cces.ca/

The CCES is an independent, national, non-profit organization. Their mission, to foster ethical sport for all Canadians, is carried out through research, promotion, education, detection and deterrence, as well as through programs and partnerships with other organizations. Their website contains a wide range of information pertaining to the ethical treatment of sport. All athletes should consult this page to make themselves aware of the programs they have in place. The CCES is responsible for administering the Canadian Anti-Doping Program (CADP http://www.cces.ca/en/antidoping/cadp) and athletes should make themselves aware of how this program affects them.

Sport Canadahttp://www.pch.gc.ca/progs/sc/index-eng.cfm

Sport Canada works to help Canadians participate and excel in sport. As part of the Department of Canadian Heritage, Sport Canada strengthens the unique contribution that sport makes to Canadian identity, culture and society. They are the distributor of funds through the Athlete Assistance Program (AAP). The policies, procedures and guidelines for AAP are available online at http://www.pch.gc.ca/pgm/sc/pol/athl/index-eng.cfm. If you are concerned with your athlete agreement, or want a reference for reviewing your agreement, the basics are to be found on this page.

National Sport Organizations (NSOs)

One of the most important sources of information for an athlete’s reference is their respective NSO’s website.  AthletesCAN has compiled a list of these sites here. Often the policies and procedures for appeals, carding and selection criteria, and other important documents are available through these NSO specific sites. Otherwise you can contact the NSO to provide you with whatever documentation you require.

Sport Law & Strategy Grouphttp://www.sportlaw.ca/

The Sport Law & Strategy Group (formerly the Centre for Sport and Law) was founded in 1992.  The group provides legal solutions, planning and governance services, and strategic communications consulting in the Canadian sport system.  They DO NOT represent athletes; their services are aimed at representing NSOs in appeal hearings and conducting the internal appeal processes for NSOs.  However, their website may be useful for contacting individuals within their organization about appeal proceedings, or if you are encouraging your NSO to change their policies and procedures.


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